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2009 CPA EXAMINATION SUMMIT-

INSIGHTS INTO INCREASING THE NUMBER OF AFRICAN AMERICAN CPAS
Part 3


The Howard University School of Business (HUSB) Center for Accounting Education (CAE) and the National Association of Black Accountants, Inc. (NABA) co-sponsored the third one-day CPA Examination Summit during NABA’s 2009 Annual National Convention in New Orleans. This year’s Summit continued to explore why there are so few African-American CPAs and focused on concrete steps that stakeholders can take to funnel more students into both the profession and the exam as the entry into the profession. The 2009 Summit offered the results of two related research studies, and the benefit of a panel of four young African-American accounting professionals.

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2008 CPA EXAMINATION SUMMIT-

INSIGHTS INTO INCREASING THE NUMBER OF AFRICAN AMERICAN CPAS
Part 2


The Howard University School of Business Center for Accounting Education (CAE) and the National Association of Black Accountants, Inc. (NABA) cosponsored the second one-day CPA Examination Summit (Summit) during the 2008 NABA Annual National Convention in Atlanta. The first Summit was held during NABA’s 2007 convention in Philadelphia. The purpose of the Summit was twofold:
To measure progress from the previous year’s exploration of why an increasing number of African Americans are not sitting for nor passing the CPA Examination; and
To develop strategies for increasing the number of African Americans taking the exam.

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2007 CPA EXAMINATION SUMMIT-

INSIGHTS INTO INCREASING THE NUMBER OF AFRICAN AMERICAN CPAS
Part 1


The Howard University School of Business Center for Accounting Education (CAE) and the National Association of Black Accountants, Inc. (NABA) co-sponsored a one-day CPA Examination Summit during the NABA 2007 Annual Conference in Philadelphia. The purpose of the Summit was to explore the perception that increasing numbers of African Americans are neither sitting for nor passing the CPA examination, and therefore not becoming CPAs. Given the increasing need for CPAs in the public and private sectors, the slow increase in the number of CPAs overall is cause for concern, but especially so when that number is evaluated by race and ethnicity.

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